CUNY WriteSite


Ann setting up her main idea:
Dawn Powell's work have been ignored by most feminist critics. Why? Well, I guess it's because they didn't think her female characters were very noble or very nice or that her work had much to say about women's lives. But I think people should recognize that she is writing a very important story about women's changing relationship to public life. She's writing about women coming to big cities and making their way in the public world. That's actually pretty exciting. I mean, it was a big deal at the time.

There are a few important things missing from this draft. The reader has no idea who Dawn Powell is or when she lived or what kind of work she did.
Here's Ann adding necessary background material.

Described by Glenway Wescott as the only writer "doing for New York what Balzac did for Paris," Dawn Powell wrote thirteen novels between 1928 and 1962, almost all of which concern themselves with the dream of making it to — or making it in — New York City.

Over the years, Powell has been ignored by many feminist critics because they didn't think her female characters were very noble or very nice or that her work had much to say about women's lives. But I think more people should recognize that she is writing a very important story about women's changing relationship to public life. She's writing about women coming to big cities and making their way in the public world.

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