CUNY WriteSite CUNY WriteSite

Types of Fragments » Compound Predicates (punctuated as sentences)

The old men pay no attention to traffic signals, so drivers often honk at them. And go straight to the park without looking at anything.
In the example above, the fragment is "And go straight to the park without looking at anything." It is actually the second half of a compound predicate; that is, another action that the subject of the sentence is doing. A compound predicate divided and punctuated as if it were two complete sentences can be confusing. To fix the passage above, we can use a comma instead of the period after "them." This would help make it clear that the second part of the compound predicate—"and then go straight into the park"— refers to the two old men:
The old men pay no attention to traffic signals, so drivers often honk at them, and go straight to the park without looking at anything.



The CUNY WriteSite
Search | Site Index | Introduction | Writing Projects | Writing for Exams
Grammar and Style | Net Library | Conversations | Campus Resources | Teachers and Tutors

© 2000 The City University of New York
All rights reserved.